Reviews of Attainable Hi-Fi & Home-Theater Equipment


Reviews of Attainable Hi-Fi & Home-Theater Equipment

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To Hans Wetzel,

I am setting up a secondary audio system for my home, but I am having a very hard time trying to determine which amplifier to use. The reason is that we don´t have too many dealers around here, so I need to purchase the product through the Internet, without being able to make an audition.

After extensive research I have come to two alternatives, but I cannot pick between them. One is to get a Hegel Music Systems H80 integrated amplifier-DAC, and use it with my Oppo BDP-103 player as a transport and my Lenovo computer. The other is to get the Rogue Audio Sphinx integrated amplifier, and pair it with the Oppo BDP-105, which also has S/PDIF, optical, and USB inputs, and then can act as a DAC. In both cases I would be using the new MartinLogan Motion 35XT bookshelf speakers, which I bought about three months ago.

Your review of the Sphinx really impressed me, especially when you made comparisons with your Hegel H300 [integrated amplifier-DAC]. In my main system I use an Audio Research VSi60 integrated amplifier; a Bel Canto DAC2.7, CD3t transport, and REFLink USB converter; and a pair of MartinLogan Ethos electrostatic speakers. All of them are connected [through] DH Labs cables. This is to say that I love tubes, so the Sphinx is a great alternative.

However, I am a little scared about the class-D amp. Recently I had a Bel Canto C5i and it sounded exactly like you described in your review: “I find that class-D has a characteristic sound: clear and quiet, but often sounding thin through the midrange, as if singers and instruments had gone on a diet. Bass seems to get lost in translation, with low frequencies noticeably abbreviated. Overall, class-D sounds a bit etched -- mechanical, artificial, and decidedly not immersive. Also, I have no idea about the Rogue´s signal-to-noise ratio, and since I cannot hear the product I consider this an important reference.

On the other hand, I like the Hegel’s convenience (amp and DAC in one device), and I’ve heard excellent things about this Norwegian company. My hesitancy comes from the fact that I hate excessive brightness and fatiguing tweeters (that’s why I go with electrostatics and tubes), and I don’t know if this amp will have glare. Furthermore, I agree with you on the fact that an amp’s ability to get you involved with the music is more important than its accuracy or measured performance, and that’s another good argument for the Rogue.

So, given the fact that you have experience with both the H80 and the Sphinx, what would you do in my case? I know it is pretty hard to recommend things, since sound depends on so many variables: cables, speakers, and personal preferences. However, I would very much appreciate your opinion.

Please receive my best regards!
Luis Perez
Costa Rica

You have picked two great products, Luis, but I worry that neither is exactly what you are looking for. Since you are a proud tube fan, and owner of a lovely little Audio Research unit, I worry that both the Hegel and the Rogue might stray just a bit too far out of your comfort zone. You mention brightness and fatigue being a concern, and the Rogue definitely has a little of that class-D “zing” to it. Though it is going on two years since I reviewed the Sphinx, I do recall it sounding lively in the upper midrange, with a little bit of a sibilant edge, despite having lovely presence. The Hegel, on the other hand, will have a slightly forward, but incredibly clean and smooth presentation. I happen to like the kind of immediacy that the Hegel provides, as well as the Rogue's gorgeous midrange vibrance. As to whether you will, based on your preferences, it’s difficult to say. Of the two, the Rogue would be my suggestion. If you are open minded and could live with a little more zest in the mids, the Sphinx may well win your heart. . . . Hans Wetzel